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Wednesday, May 23, 2012

The Most Important Grammar Rules All Bloggers Need to Know | Vicky Denaxa, Moneytized

[D]o you really know what it takes to perfect your content as far as proofreading and correct grammar are concerned? ... Besides the basic grammar rules that everyone must keep in mind, there are things that just plain stand out: the most important grammar rules all bloggers need to know.
So begins blogger Denaxa. She covers the following topics, and her advice is mostly sound.  I've commented below on a couple of her topics. Denaxa also refers to other websites for additional advice. Please also see my related comments at the end of this post.

Spelling Rules/Word Differences ...

Punctuation Rules ...
Denaxa is mistaken when she writes that the "American Rule" for commas and periods is to put them inside quotation marks only when they're part of the quotation. That rule applies only to question marks and exclamation points. Periods and commas always go inside quotation marks, following the standard style in most reputable style manuals published in the United States.

Capitalization Rules ...

Tense Rules ...

Grammar Rules for Numbers ...
Denaxa calls them "Grammar Rules," but they're usually style preferences of particular publications and organizations. Her examples are mostly correct, but you should check the particular style preferences for numbers in your publication or organization. For example, Associated Press style is to use numbers (not words) in various single-digit uses, such as ages, percentages and temperatures

Plural and Possessive ...

Was were where grammar rules ...

Finally, Denaxa suggests doing Google searches when you have questions about style and grammar. I advise not doing that, except to search for an online style and grammar guide that you will try to use consistently. Taking advice from a variety of Googled websites could add to your confusion and inconsistencies in your choices. As I wrote above, different publications and organizations have differing preferences on style. You should choose the style preferences of one guide and try to use it as often as possible.

I mentioned AP already. It has both print and online versions. The Chicago Manual of Style and the Gregg Reference Manual are also very useful and comprehensive -- in both the print and online versions. The online versions for all three are by paid subscription.

For a free online style manual, consider checking out mine! It's based on AP style in most cases: Garbl's Editorial Style Manual.


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